Peng Qi Guan Ding
(Qi Exchange)

The Peng Qi Guan Ding Method is the first and basic method of Zhineng Qigong. This is an external qi practice and its purpose is to harness the universal qi from all around us and bring it into our body. This has the effect of improving the quality and quantity of our bodily qi, thus improving our health and physical and mental functioning. PQGD is a practice comprising both physical movements and mental activities. The steps of the practice are summarised below:

Preparation

  1. Preparation for the practice is very important and centres around relaxing the whole body, creating a qi field around us and getting us into a qigong state of mind. Good preparation will enable us to reap maximum benefits of the qi generated by the practice.
  2. Place feet together, body upright. Relax hands at sides. Look straight ahead. Pull in vision slowly and gently close eyes (fig. 1). Relax the whole body, starting from head down to toes. Curl the tip of tongue so that it touches the upper palate. Keep it there throughout the practice.
  3. Recite silently the following eight verses while visualizing simultaneously:
    • Ding Tian Li Di - Head reaching the sky, feet plunge deep into the earth
    • Xing Song Yi Chong - Relax and imagine body merging with the universe
    • Wai Jing Nei Jing - Be respectful externally and quiet internally
    • Xin Cheng Mao Gong - Our heart is calm and our appearance reverent
    • Yi Nian Bu Qi - Clear mind of stray thoughts
    • Shen Zhu Tai Kong - Focus on the vast emptiness of the universe
    • Shen Yi Zhao Ti - Reflect back on body
    • Zhou Shen Rong Rong - Body is filled with the warm glow of univeral qi

Opening

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  1. Turn arms so palms face backward. Flex hands, with palms facing downward (fig. 1).
  2. With arms straight but relaxed, slide palms slowly forward 15 degrees. Slide back to sides of body. Repeat two times (fig. 2).
  3. Relax wrists, turn palms to face each other. Slowly lift qi up from the universe below our feet. At navel height, turn palms to direct qi into navel while thinking of the mingmen (fig. 3).
  4. Turn palms down and spread out arms sideways to the back. Turn palms to direct qi to the mingmen, while thinking of the navel (fig. 4).
  5. Raise forearms and press dabaos with middle fingers, directing qi into middle dantian (fig. 5).
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  7. Extend arms forward at shoulder height and width, with palms facing upward. When arms are straight, flex middle fingers slightly to direct qi into yintang (fig. 6).
  8. Spread arms out to the sides until in line with the body (fig. 7). Turn palms down and then up. Sweep arms upward to above head. Clasp palms together on top of head (fig, 8).
  9. Lower clasped hands along centre line of body, in front of head and rest in front of chest (fig. 9).

Step 1 - Lifting Qi from Sides

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  1. Rotate clasped fingers to point forward. Extend arms out to the front at shoulder height (fig. 10). Separate fingers, starting with little fingers. With index fingers and thumbs still touching and palms facing downward, flex palms up to face front, forming a triangle with the index fingers and thumbs. Slowly separate hands to shoulder width.
  2. Slowly pull qi from the universe into the body. Then push out to the universe. When pulling, think inside the body, when pushing think of the universe. Repeat at least two times (fig. 11).
  3. Slowly open arms to the sides 15 degrees. Slowly close arms back to shoulder width. When opening, think of the universe. When closing, think inside the body. Repeat at least two times (fig. 12).
  4. Spread arms out sideways to form a straight line with body. Slowly pull qi into the body. Slowly push out into the universe. When pulling, think inside the body. When pushing, think of the universe. Repeat at least two times (fig. 13).
  5. With arms extended and relaxed, slowly lift arms up 15 degrees. Slowly lower arms to shoulder height. Repeat at least two times (fig. 14).
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  7. Relax wrists, palms facing downward. Leading with little fingers, scoop up universal qi while turning palms upward. Raise arms, with palms holding qi, to above head. At top of head and palms at shoulder width, flex palms slightly to direct qi into the crown (baihui) of the head, pouring qi throughout the body. Hold for a few seconds (fig.15).
  8. Relax shoulders, lower elbows and palms, continue to pour qi into the body as palms are slowly lowered, passing face, chest and abdomen. At navel, lightly press middle fingers on navel, directing qi into the lower dantian (fig. 16).
  9. Trace middle fingers along waist line to the back. At mingmen, lightly press with middle fingers, directing qi into lower dantian.
  10. Slide palms down (lightly touching and yet not touching body), passing buttocks, back of thighs, calves, ankles, outer sides of feet and rest palms on top of feet (fig. 17). Press down, think of the universe below the feet. Pull up, think inside the body. Do three times (fig. 18).
  11. Turn palms to scoop qi from the universe below the feet. Lift up qi, along inside of legs, abdomen and press navel with middle fingers, directling qi into lower dantian (fig. 19). Return arms to the sides (fig. 20).

Step 2 - Lifting Qi from Front

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  1. Slowly raise arms sideways, with palms facing downward, till shoulder height (fig.21). Flex palms. Slowly pull qi from the universe into the body. Then push out to the universe. When pulling, think inside the body, when pushing think of the universe. Repeat at least two times (fig.22).
  2. Slowly close arms to the front 15 degrees. Slowly open arms back to sides. When closing, think inside the body. When opening, think of the universe. Repeat at least two times (fig. 23).
  3. Sweep arms slowly to the front until shoulder width. Slowly pull qi from the universe into the body. Then push out to the universe. When pulling, think inside the body, when pushing think of the universe. Repeat at least two times (fig. 24).
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  5. With arms extended and relaxed, slowly lift arms up 15 degrees. Slowly lower arms to shoulder height. Repeat at least two times (fig.25).
  6. Relax wrists. Leading with little fingers, scoop up universal qi while turning palms to face each other. Raise arms, with palms holding qi, to above head. At top of head and palms at shoulder width, flex palms slightly to direct qi into the crown (baihui) of the head, pouring qi throughout the body. Hold for a few seconds.
  7. Relax shoulders, lower elbows and palms, continue to pour qi into the body as palms are slowly lowered. At mid-brow level, press yintang with middle fingers 26).
  8. Trace fingers along eye brows, pass ears to back of head. Press yuzhen.
  9. Trace middle fingers down along the neck and down the back as far as you can go (fig. 27). Move hands around the shoulders, armpits, then to the point at the back where you left earlier (fig. 28). Trace downward along the backbone to waist and press mingmen, directing qi into lower dantian (fig. 29).
  10. Trace fingers along waistline to the front. Press navel, directing qi into lower dantian.
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  12. Slide palms downwards, passing lower abdomen, inner sides of thighs, calves, ankles, inner edges of feet and rest palms on top of feet. Press down, think of the universe below the feet. Pull up, think inside the body. Do three times (fig. 30).
  13. Turn palms to scoop qi from the universe below the feet. Move palms to back of feet, up back of legs, buttock and press mingmen with middle fingers (fig. 31).
  14. Trace fingers along waistline to the front. Press navel, directing qi into lower dantian (fig.32). Return arms to the sides (fig. 33).

Step 3 - Lifting Qi Diagonally

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  1. Turn palms to face each other. Slowly raise arms diagonally (45 degrees to body), collecting qi from deep in the universe. At shoulder height, slowly turn palms upward as arms continue moving to top of head (fig. 34). At top of head and with palms at shoulder width, flex palms slightly to direct qi into the crown (baihui) of the head, pouring qi throughout the body. Hold for a few seconds.
  2. Relax shoulders, lower elbows and palms, continue to pour qi into the body as palms are slowly lowered, down sides of head, passing ears and neck. At shoulder height, turn palms to face front (fig. 35 & 36).
  3. Push out with right hand, keeping left hand in front of left shoulder. When arm is almost straight, relax wrist and turn right palm to face the left. Turn upper body to the left, scooping qi from the horizon with right palm (fig. 37). At 90 degrees, press zhongqui (middle joint of middle finger) with thumb (fig. 38).
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  5. Continue moving right hand to the back, around shoulders and press left qihu with right middle finger, while simultaneously turning body to face front (fig. 39).
  6. Push out with left hand. When arm is almost straight, relax wrist and turn left palm to face the right. Turn upper body to the right, scooping qi from the horizon with left palm. At 90 degrees, press zhongqui with thumb.
  7. Continue moving left hand to the back, around shoulders and press right qihu with left middle finger, while simultaneously turning body to face front (fig. 40).
  8. Stop for 3 breathing cycle. When breathing in, press qihus with fingers, when breathing out, relax.
  9. Relax hands, turn crossed arms forward and rotate hands to form a blooming lotus. Clasp palms in front of chest (fig. 41).

Closing

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  1. Raise clasped palms to top of the head. Stretch upwards (fig. 42).
  2. Turn palms to face front. Lower arms sideways. At shoulder level, turn palms upward. Sweep arms to the front until shoulder width. Flex middle fingers slightly to direct qi to yintang (fig. 43).
  3. Lower elbows and retract arms. Press dabaos with middle fingers, think of the middle dantian.
  4. Extend hands and arms to the back. Spread arms out sideways. On reaching the sides of body, rotate palms to face front. Continue moving arms and palms to the front, scooping qi along the way (fig. 44).
  5. At front of body, close palms on top of navel (for men, right palm on top of left palm, reverse for ladies). Relax and visualise qi entering the lower dantian. Nourish qi for a minute (fig. 45).
  6. Return arms to sides of body (fig. 46). Open eyes slowly.